NFL | Super Bowl LIV: “The Next 100”


NFL: “The Next 100: Super Bowl LIV”

NFL: “The Next 100: Super Bowl LIV Teaser: Hot Dog Cart”

NFL: “The Next 100: Super Bowl LIV Teaser: One Take”

NFL: “The Next 100: Super Bowl LIV Teaser: Aaron Donald and Joey Bosa”

NFL: “The Next 100: Super Bowl LIV Teaser: Jugs Machine”

LONG-FORM COMMERCIAL | SOCIAL TEASERS
ROLE: Senior Flame Artist / VFX Compositor
VENDOR: The Mill
CLIENT: NFL
AGENCY: 72andSunny
PRODUCTION CO: Prettybird
DIRECTOR: Max Malkin

How do you top last years’ NFL Super Bowl entry “The 100 Year Game,” which featured just about every NFL star player your could think of?

You not only do the same, but you take it on the road, cross-country and coast-to-coast, in a game to end all games.

This year’s long-form NFL spot for Super Bowl LIV features a young boy, playing football in a rural town, who decides the field just isn’t big enough, and opts to keep running past the goal and beyond. Along his path, he encounters numerous NFL vets and pros, urging him to “Take it to the House Kid.”

When he finally arrives at the Hard Rock Stadium in Florida, the filmed spot segues into a live broadcasted segment of the boy, and a crowd of young football fans, entering the stadium, delivering the ball for the game kick-off. The finished spot spliced in the live portion for subsequent broadcast.

“The Next 100” was a massive project, at 2.5 minutes in length, with upwards to 100 effects shots, 20+ unique social deliverables, and a little under a week and a half to finish it all. The team was large, lead by The Mill’s Adam Lambert, with numerous senior artists working as fast as possible to deliver the project early enough to allow rehearsals for the live televised segment. To top it all off, none of us was really quite sure if it was actually going to work.

As I did for the previous year’s “The 100 Year Game,” I primarily handled all the social deliverables for “The Next 100,” four of which are included above. These featured shots from the long-form spot, as well as unique takes, and additional or extended shots. Some of my shots ended up in the long-form. Some long-form shots ended up in the socials. And whenever I had downtime, I picked up additional work from the long-form.

It was a big, high-speed juggling act that required everyone to be in top-form from start to finish.

As is common with these NFL spots, clean-up was abundant, from unlicensed signage to t-shirt logo removal to all that subjective stuff that makes shots look better. There was a fair share of plate retiming, and the subsequent paint-work that comes with it, as well as greenscreen comps, split-screens, matte paintings, etc.

On my end, I also had the usual finishing tasks that come with social deliverables, including alternate edits, subtitling, supers, color corrections, shot repos, and pan-and-scan treatments for various aspect ratios, all specific to the given delivery formats.

Full Credits

Super Bowl 2019 | NFL: “The 100 Year Game”


SUPER BOWL COMMERCIAL
ROLE: Lead Flame Artist / VFX Compositor
VENDOR: The Mill
AGENCY: 72andSunny
PRODUCTION CO: Film 47
DIRECTOR: Peter Berg

How many NFL stars can fit into one two minute commercial? Apparently, all of them. At least, it seemed that way at the time. Short turnaround spot with lots of random nit picky clean up notes. A few hair and head transplants to mask the stunt doubles. And lots of carpet grooming. What else would you expect from a Super Bowl spot?

Full Credits

Nike | NFL: “Vikings”


PROMO
ROLE: Senior Flame Artist / VFX Compositor
VENDOR: Logan
CLIENT: Nike, NFL

These all-CG Nike NFL promo spots signal the introduction of Nike-sponsored new uniforms for the given teams. Above is the Vikings spot. But I also worked on spots for the Dolphins and Jaguars.

These promos were tricky due to the compressed schedule (a perpetually common trend), and a need to split work between Flame and Nuke. This meant all the base comps were done in Nuke, with Flame being used to soften the CG curse that comes with short schedules and little time for revision.

All of my work was done on top of the base Nuke comps, which typically got things within 85-90% of the way there. Flame was used for enhancing CG integration through a variety of techniques, from introducing lens distortion and stylized DOF to re-lighting and re-grading elements to shape the focus and depth of given shots.

In addition, flares, glows, and vignettes were judiciously added to increase the impact of each spot.